Ending Type 2 Diabetes One Exercise, Nutrition, and Gardening Class at a Time

Posts Tagged ‘Endocrine Disorders’

Dr. Camp’s Diabetes Prevention Research Featured on MDLinx

In Diabetes Prevention Resources on April 14, 2011 at 6:03 PM

The article ‘Quality improvement in community health centres: the role of microsystem characteristics in the implementation of a diabetes prevention initiative’ in Quality & Safety in Health Care was recently featured on MDLinx.com! MDLinx carries an index of health-related articles for medical professionals. Click here to read the article.

Diabetes Prevention Programs: Not a One-Hit-Wonder

In About the Program on December 21, 2010 at 5:06 PM

This morning, traditional irrigation was replaced by gardeners’ tears. It’s no secret that around these parts, people’s lives are tough. That their stories are not surprising, however, doesn’t make them any less disturbing. It seems as though the garden fosters candor rarely found outside the doctor’s office. Tearing out dead hot pepper plants, Mirabelle was through suppressing her tears; a son unjustly incarcerated, a mother crippled by diabetes, and a friends’ children wondering where their recently deceased father has gone.

Being the Communications Manager for the Diabetes Prevention Program, my attention was momentarily diverted when she expressed her dismay at the 4 year old’s weight. Her recently deceased friend left behind a wife, 4-year old boy, and 10-year old girl. At the funeral, the boy was hungry. Mirabelle’s funeral pictures revealed the grave, the family in mourning, and the boy at work on a monumental sandwich. ‘Solo come, Rebecca. Esta engordando mucho.’ He only eats, Rebecca. He’s gaining a lot of weight.

In other words, diabetes is complex. The disease is bred from the full spectrum of life’s challenges. Diabetes prevention, therefore, is equally complex. It does not – it cannot – stop at exercise, nutrition, or gardening classes.

Hope for Diabetes Prevention Grows in Chabaso’s New Haven Garden – Press Release

In About the Program on November 4, 2010 at 5:02 PM

Click below to read a comprehensive view of Chabaso and the Fair Haven Community Health Center’s partnership.

News Release

Contact: Dorothy Radlicz
203.562.9007 x838
dradlicz@chabaso.com

Hope for Diabetes Prevention Grows
in Chabaso’s New Haven Garden

New Haven, Conn. (October 8, 2010) – Chabaso Bakery and Fair Haven Community Health Center have partnered to prevent diabetes in the Fair Haven neighborhood of New Haven, with a new garden and education program to promote healthy lifestyle habits among people at risk.

Fair Haven Community Health Center (FHCHC) is a not-for-profit health care organization providing primary care and a full spectrum of community wellness programs in the surrounding underserved neighborhood.  Alarmed by diabetes rates approaching an epidemic scale among younger individuals, FHCHC medical professionals founded the Diabetes Prevention Program in 2007 as a family-focused lifestyle intervention program.  Through nutrition and physical education classes, participants battle a calamitous disease that many forget or don’t know is treatable and preventable.

The Diabetes Prevention Program starts by screening all at-risk patients of the FHCHC identifying those individuals most likely to contract the debilitating and deadly disease. The second phase of the prevention program engages whole families, enlisting children and parents to learn about diet and nutrition, exercise, and other aspects of healthy lifestyles. This program was initially funded by Connecticut Health Foundation and is now part of a larger research study with the Donaghue Foundation-supported Yale Center for Clinical Investigation.

According to Anne Camp, MD, the Director of FHCHC’s unique family-oriented Diabetes Prevention Program, “We’ve added an innovative community gardening component to our strategy.  People with borderline diabetes can become members of the garden by planting, weeding, and taking home a share of the harvest. As an added benefit, the garden provides at-risk patients of all ages with plenty of healthful exercise, as well as education about nutrition-packed vegetables not ordinarily found in this area of the city.”

The Garden itself embodies the vision of local New Haven entrepreneur and community benefactor, Charles Negaro, owner of Chabaso Bakery. Mr. Negaro designed this garden adjacent to his artisan bakery some years ago.  “It was intended to provide healthy food for bakery employees,” Negaro said. “Realizing that the garden required more than part-time attention, I began searching for volunteer gardeners from the community. At the same time, Dr. Camp was looking for a garden space not too far from Fair Haven Community Health Center.” Conveniently, the Diabetes Prevention Program fit right into Chabaso’s neighborhood gardening initiative. Gardening has since become a mainstay of family health, fitness, and fun at FHCHC.”

“It has been proven that high-risk individuals can delay or avoid developing Type 2 Diabetes through regular physical activity and a diet low in fat and calories,” said Rebecca Kline, Diabetes Prevention Program Communications Manager at FHCHC, and FHCHC/Chabaso Community Garden Manager. “We are reducing the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes here in New Haven,” Ms. Kline reports. “In an urban area where 88% of the population lives below the federal poverty level, and fresh produce is an anomaly, it is not an easy task to stay healthy. Access to tasty, fresh veggies, knowledge of their nutritional and dietary value, beneficial gardening exercise and awareness of the implications of diabetes have been combined to successfully reduce the risk of diabetes among program participants.”

Improved access to nutritious foods through the garden, and comprehensive lifestyle education are signs of a win-win health intervention. The program aims to expand participation, garden acreage, and influence throughout the neighborhood.

For more information on the FHCHC/Chabaso Community Garden, contact Rebecca Kline, Garden Manager, at rebkline@gmail.com

To make a donation to the FHCHC Diabetes Prevention Program go to this web link:https://www.justgive.org/basket?acton=donate&ein=06-0883545
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Chabaso Bakery was established in New Haven, Connecticut in 1995. The local community recognized the outstanding taste and bona fide quality of the bakery’s bread and sustained the fledgling business. Using authentic old-world ovens, only the best natural ingredients and no trans-fats, founder Charles Negaro, and some very talented bakers, set out to match the best ciabattas, loaves, batards, rolls, Stix™, baguettes and boules in the world. Today Chabaso breads are available fresh every day in small food stores and large supermarket chains along the US east coast. For more information call (203) 562 9007, or visit online at www.chabaso.com

http://www.chabaso.com/index.php?mact=News,cntnt01,detail,0&cntnt01articleid=54&cntnt01detailtemplate=press_releases&cntnt01returnid=133

Where Diabetes Prevention Began at FHCHC: from Individual to Systematic Care Models OGTT RECRUITMENT

In OGTT Screening on August 20, 2010 at 9:29 AM

“Do you prefer English or Spanish?” Our Diabetes Prevention Program Coordinator asks the woman on the phone. She is scheduling a patient for a diabetes screening. Recruitment for FHCHC’s screenings, however, starts long before this phone call. Indeed, it begins when patients walk in the door of the clinic. In key locations along the hallways, elevators, and rooms are posters about diabetes risk factors and the opportunity that people have to be screened. Any clinician that suspects prediabetes now fills out a diabetes referral form (see below), which is then directed to the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) Staff. The DPP staff then call all who have received referrals to schedule a time for them, and often their families, to come in. As I write this, our program coordinators are scheduling people for one month from now.

Because the screening days are so action-packed, one of our clinicians has begun calling patients the week of the screening to have preliminary conversations. It is both a way to ensure attendance and increase the effeciency on the day of the screening. Her prep work has illustrated how educated patients are before they walk in the door on screening morning, and given her an opportunity to make a personal connection with attendees. To that end, their lack of attendance sometimes becomes a personal affront as well!

 

Diabetes Prevention Program Referral Form:

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