Ending Type 2 Diabetes One Exercise, Nutrition, and Gardening Class at a Time

Posts Tagged ‘National Institutes of Health’

Come Exercise with Us! FHCHC DPP’s Exercise Class Video!

In Fitness Class on March 29, 2012 at 4:39 PM

Check out the FHCHC DPP’s latest video, and do the health-enhancing exercise video with us! No fancy equipment or space needed!

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Millions of Americans Have Diabetes and Don’t Know It

In About the Program on March 18, 2011 at 10:54 AM

On Diabetes Alert Day, Take Action to Learn Your Risk

In observance of Diabetes Alert Day (March 22), the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) and the Fair Haven Community Health Center’s Diabetes Prevention Program are encouraging people to take NDEP’s Diabetes Risk Test [http://ndep.nih.gov/resources/ResourceDetail.aspx?ResId=252] –available in English and Spanish –to find out if they are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This one-day ‘wake-up call’ asks people across the nation to know their risk of diabetes.

 

Nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes – including 279,000 people in Connecticut. It is estimated that nearly one-third of the people with diabetes, or 90,000 Connecticut adults, do not know that they have the disease.  An estimated 79 million adults have pre-diabetes, placing them at increased risk for developing the disease.

 

“Diabetes is a serious disease, particularly when it is left undiagnosed or untreated,” said Dr. Anne Camp, Director of Fair Haven Community Health Center’s Diabetes Prevention Program. “Everyone should be aware of their risk for diabetes.  If you have a family history of diabetes – such as a mother, father, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes – or if you had diabetes during pregnancy – you need to know that you are at increased risk.”

 

Other risk factors for diabetes include being overweight, physically inactive, and being over the age of 45. Diabetes also is more common in African Americans, people of African Ancestry, Hispanics/Latinos, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders.

 

If left undiagnosed or untreated, diabetes can lead to serious health problems such as heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, stroke, amputation, and even death.  With early diagnosis and treatment, people with diabetes can delay or prevent the development of these health problems.

 

“If you are at risk for diabetes, the good news is that you can take action now to lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes by making – and maintaining – healthy lifestyle changes,” says Dr. Camp.

 

Studies have shown that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed by losing a small amount of weight – 5 to 7 percent (10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person) – and becoming more active. Action steps include making healthy food choices and being active at least 30 minutes, five days per week. One way to help people achieve their health goal is to write down everything they eat and drink and the number of minutes they are active each day. They should review their notes daily.

 

The Fair Haven Community Health Center Diabetes Prevention Program provides diabetes testing to all patients and their families who are at risk for diabetes. Patients who are prediabetic are then invited to participate in exercise, nutrition, and gardening classes at nearby John Martinez School and Chabaso Bakery.

 

To learn more about your risk for developing type 2 diabetes, check out NDEP’s Diabetes Risk Test, available in English and Spanish. Additional diabetes resources can be found on the NDEP website, www.YourDiabetesInfo.org. For more information about the Fair Haven Community Health Center Diabetes Prevention Program, call 203.777.7411 or go to www.diabetespreventionprogram.wordpress.com.

 

 

For more information on the Diabetes Prevention Program, go to diabetespreventionprogram.wordpress.org or contact Rebecca Kline r.kline@fhchc.org. The Fair Haven Community Health Center is a not-for-profit primary health care organization that has been dedicated to serving the greater Fair Haven Community since 1971.  We provide comprehensive health care – from prenatal to pediatric, adolescent to adult and geriatric.  Our mission is to provide excellent, accessible health care to the residents of our community, regardless of their ability to pay.

 

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services‘ National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) is jointly sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with the support of more than 200 partner organizations. Its Small Steps. Big Rewards Prevent Type 2 Diabetes. campaign communicates that type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed through modest lifestyle changes.

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Intake Invitations: See How They’re Done

In Intensive Lifestyle Intervention - General on February 28, 2011 at 3:24 PM

At the Fair Haven Community Health Center, prediabetic patients are invited to participate in the Diabetes Prevention Program research study. If interested, they are randomized, and placed in one of two research tracks – delayed, which means they continue seeing their providers every three months and have a consultation with a nutritionist; or immediate, which means they join an intensive lifestyle intervention modeled after the National Institutes of Health’s Diabetes Prevention Program. Reaching out, explaining, inviting, and solidifying participation in the study is no small task.

This short video gives you an intimate view of the process, and provides the basic tools to be able to replicate the tenants of the invitations.

Tailoring Programs Is Essential

In About the Program on January 5, 2011 at 10:25 AM

Two recent videos, when combined, illustrate a driving force behind FHCHC’s Diabetes Prevention Program: tailoring. The National Institute of Health’s Diabetes Prevention Program is a brilliant and successful program. Central to its success, however, is that it is perfect for the population to whom it was originally delivered. Aligned with a long lineage of community health centers that focus on tailoring health care to fit their particular population’s character and constraints, so did FHCHC’s Diabetes Prevention Program adjust the original curriculum to fit the needs of Hispanic families in Fair Haven, Connecticut. Around the same time that FHCHC’s Diabetes Prevention Program was being translated and readied for execution, Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point and many other noteworthy titles, delivered a Ted Talk in which he demonstrates the importance of tailoring products to fit the needs of those being served. Watch Gladwell’s Ted Talk here.

Malcolmgladwellflickr

wikipedia.com

And like FHCHC’s Diabetes Prevention Program, state politicians and health officials on the smallest and most obese republic in the world are implementing a site-specific diabetes prevention strategy to try to reverse the effects of a homogenous western diet on the Pacific island. See ABC News’ video on Nauru here.

janeresture.com

Although diabetes is a disease that is common to most developed and developing nations today, ensuring the success of diabetes-centered health interventions is contingent upon this tailoring principle.

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